A Caution in the Age of COVID-19
March 14, 2020 – 9:39 pm | Comments Off on A Caution in the Age of COVID-19

Many events that draw crowds have been postponed or cancelled.
If you’re planning to travel to a flower or garden event, check with the organizers to see that it’s still happening.
It’s probably been canceled, …

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Philadelphia International Flower Show

Submitted by on February 6, 2011 – 10:29 pmNo Comment
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The Philadelphia International Flower Show, the world’s largest indoor display of flowers, takes place each spring in the Pennsylvania Convention Center, 1101 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The theme for this year’s show, set for March 6 through 13, 2011, is “Springtime in Paris”.

Flower Show garden display exhibitors undertake the art of forcing trees, shrubs and perennials into bloom for the Show, using temperature and lighting controls to “fool” plants into full bloom in time for the March event. Each year, some 60 professional landscapers, florists, and horticultural and educational organizations create full-scale gardens and floral displays for the show.

Plant societies exhibiting include the American Boxwood Society, American Ivy Society, American Rhododendron Society (Greater Philadelphia Chapter), Delaware Valley Fern and Wildflower Society, North American Rock Garden Society (Delaware Valley Chapter), Philadelphia Cactus & Succulent Society and American Orchid Society.

Each ticket sold helps the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society toward its goal of planting one million trees in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.

The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society and Boehm American Porcelain have collaborated in creating “Friends” (pictured at right) to commemorate the 2010 Philadelphia International Flower Show and as a tribute to the beauty of flowers found around the world. The golden medallion authenticates “Friends” as a Philadelphia International Flower Show Exclusive, and was produced in a limited edition of 100 sculptures for $1800.

(Photo at top © Pennsylvania Horticultural Society)

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