2019 is the Year of the Snapdragon
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Seedless Plants? How Does that Work?

Submitted by on May 19, 2019 – 8:08 amNo Comment
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strawberry plantsSpitting out watermelon seeds can be a summertime rite of passage for some folks. Others like their watermelons seedless. How did those seedless watermelons (and other plants) come about? The May 7, 2019, edition of Sustainable, Secure Food blog explains the topic of polyploidy.

“Plants can have multiple sets of chromosomes, which is called polyploidy. Many of your favorite fruits and vegetables are polyploids,” says blogger and plant scientist, Christine Bradish, Ashland, Inc. “Polyploidy can occur naturally, where wild species ‘add together’ their DNA. Two good examples of this are wheat and strawberries.”

But, plant breeders can also develop work to develop crops without seeds – like seedless watermelons. Even bananas are seedless.

“Polyploidy is one more tool that scientists can use to learn about the genetics of crop plants,” says Bradish.

Want to read the complete blog? Click here. This blog is sponsored and written by members of the American Society of Agronomy and Crop Science Society of America.

(Photo courtesy of Morguefile via Sustainable, Secure Food)

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