‘Tis the Season for Holiday Light Shows in Gardens
November 3, 2019 – 9:53 pm | Comments Off on ‘Tis the Season for Holiday Light Shows in Gardens

As the daylight dwindles, botanical gardens and other public outdoor venues turn on fanciful light shows to attract visitors. November and December are the prime months for such extravaganzas.
Now through December 29, the Royal Botanic …

Read the full story »
Eastern Canada

Europe

Great Gardens

Midwestern USA

Western USA

Home » Western USA

“Mumvember” at Lan Su Chinese Gardens

Submitted by on October 28, 2019 – 8:37 amNo Comment
Share

Mumvember at Lan Su Chinese Gardens, Portland, OregonIt’s “Mumvember” at Lan Su Chinese Garden, 239 NW Everett Street, Portland, Oregon, Friday (November 1, 2019) through November 30, 2019.

Inspired by chrysanthemum displays found in gardens throughout China, Lan Su presents the biggest “Mumvember” display ever held in the garden.

Cascading mums in the Courtyard of Tranquility will be displayed on pedestals to highlight form and beauty. In the Scholars’ Courtyard a “Sunset on the Water” theme will create a chrysanthemum floral illusion. Look for special displays in front of the Teahouse and in the “Boat on the Lake”.

During the month of November, Lan Su Chinese Garden will be packed with hundreds of potted chrysanthemums displayed throughout the garden. More than 75 different chrysanthemum varieties will unfurl in all colors, shapes, and sizes including: spiders, quills, spoons, regular incurves, irregular incurves, reflexes, semi-doubles, anemones, brush, thistle, and exotics. Look for the typical oranges, reds and yellows of autumn plus unusually bright pinks, pale lavenders, lime green, and even stripes of the chrysanthemum.

Chrysanthemums are mentioned in Chinese literature as early as the 7th century BCE and inspired more writing in China than any other plant — likely the result of early praise by the famous poet Tao Yuanming (365-427 CE) whose poems about chrysanthemums have been recited by generation after generation.

Along with the plum, orchid and bamboo, the chrysanthemum has become known as one of the “Four Gentleman of Flowers” in China. Revered for its late and long-lasting bloom, these characteristics were likened to those of the mature “gentleman” scholar whose wisdom and integrity grew with each year.

The Chinese have long been masters at chrysanthemum cultivation developing more than 20 cultivars by the 10th century and 2,000 by the early 19th. Chrysanthemums have many practical uses, including as a source for tea, wine, and medicine.

In May, the horticulture staff took hundreds of cuttings from last year’s stock plants. Each cutting was labeled, watered and tended for weeks until it developed enough roots to be transferred to a one-gallon pot.

By the end of June, each one-gallon potted plant was fertilized and began to sprout new growth.

By July, most all of the plants grew beyond 10 inches and were cut back to six inches to promote branching. Plants were re-potted to larger two-gallon pots.

In August, the larger, bushier plants were staked. The large-flowering types were dis-budded (by hand) to a single king bud encouraging blooms up to three or four inches wide.

At the end of October, the potted plants are brought from the off-site greenhouse to Lan Su Chinese Garden, then unloaded and staged on all Lan Su’s terraces and pavilions.

(Photo courtesy of Lan Su Chinese Gardens)

Comments are closed.